Early Voting

Not so long ago, Americans assembled on one designated day — Election Day — to choose our national leaders.

For those unable to cast votes on Election Day, early voting and absentee ballots are available options. In-person early voting has the advantage of the individual citizen at a polling place after check-in by election officials.

Today, however, early voting periods have been stretched to absurd lengths, with some states beginning their voting for the November election more than a month or more in advance. There is no empirical evidence that early voting increases turnout, but it does have serious downsides, including:

    • Producing less-informed voters. After casting an early ballot, a voter checks out of the national debate regardless of what happens. They won’t care about the televised debates, won’t consider options, and won’t fully participate in the political process. Many voters have occasionally complained to election officials and representatives of a desire to recast their vote because they have changed their mind. In most, if not all states, this is impossible to do with early voting.
    • Increasing election administration and campaign costs. Elections that drag on for weeks require the logistical costs of administering an election, including more poll workers and salaries associated with the voting process.
    • Facilitating double voting and vote fraud. Counties that utilize early voting need to have the necessary technology to ensure simultaneous verification and record of vote history. Early voting allows voters to vote anywhere in the county, not simply in their precinct. The jurisdictions must have the necessary voting equipment, statewide registration system, and electronic poll book system to prevent individuals from voting more than once in the state or county during the early voting period. It is also more difficult for political parties to secure sufficient poll watchers to monitor polling places for an extended early voting period.

ACRU Commentary

Pennsylvania mail ballot problems kept tens of thousands from voting in primary election

To make sure your vote counts, vote in person. Wear your mask, stay six feet behind your neighbors, wash your hands when you’re done, and don’t mail your ballot. With evidence coming in from mail-in ballot fails from several states, USPS admits it cannot handle the load. Because of postal drag, at least 92,000 votes in Pennsylvania’s recent primary were not counted. Don’t let that be you in November.

A citizen’s reminder: absentee ballots have not gone extinct

We are grateful to Mr. Brian Glass of Virginia, who points out in clear prose; 1. A list of confirmed cases of mail-in vote fraud; and 2. The difference between universal mail-in ballots and intentionally requesting an absentee ballot. Yes, we all know this, but sometimes the obvious things are lost in the debate. Everyone in America can still request an absentee ballot. With their name on it. That comes to their actual house.

And also, the dog ate my ballot

Tennessee officials on Friday sought an appeal and an immediate pause to a court’s ruling this week that lets all 4. 1 million registered voters vote by mail during to the coronavirus pandemic, as the state made updates to its materials to reflect the expansion. The state attorney general’s office filed the request in Davidson County Chancery Court to appeal and stay that court’s temporary injunction that expanded absentee eligibility Thursday.

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News

Is the liberal demand for unsolicited ballots planned chaos?

EIB has been documenting the confusion inherent in the liberal push for mail-only balloting—including in this edition. The evidence is clear. Our colleague Chuck DeVore of the Texas Public Policy Foundation succinctly notes, “the rush to mail-in balloting will overwhelm the local elections officials who do the job of counting the vote.” We suggest this was exactly what the left planned. 

Liberal vote activist foundation, collect ballots thyself

Much like the CTCL described in the previous story, the Committee of Seventy is a PA-based liberal voting activist group masquerading as non-partisan. Its Director is a Clinton/Reno protégée, and is funded by liberal foundations. Now the City of Philadelphia has contracted with this group to help collect ballots.

Liberal vote activist foundation, funds liberal vote activist foundation advisor

The Center for Tech and Civic Life is a leftist group claiming to use technology to “modernize” voting. Funded by liberal companies and run by self-identified progressive and Obama-affiliated staff, it is insinuating itself into elections. CTCL just gave Dallas County election administrator Toni Pippins-Poole $15 million for “voting operations” after Gov. Abbott wisely halted the liberal push for unsolicited mail-only ballots. Coincidentally, Ms. Pippins-Poole is also a CTCL advisor.

County Commissioner accused of using disability protections to cheat

All fraud stories are awful, but some are absolutely disgraceful. An elected Democrat official in Texas and his buddies have been charged with illegal ballot harvesting — getting “voters’ to pretend they were disabled and entitled to ADA guidelines. Let’s hope being charged with 130+ felonies is a warning to other fraudsters thinking about using important disability community protections as a scheme to steal votes.

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