Early Voting

Not so long ago, Americans assembled on one designated day — Election Day — to choose our national leaders.

For those unable to cast votes on Election Day, early voting and absentee ballots are available options. In-person early voting has the advantage of the individual citizen at a polling place after check-in by election officials.

Today, however, early voting periods have been stretched to absurd lengths, with some states beginning their voting for the November election more than a month or more in advance. There is no empirical evidence that early voting increases turnout, but it does have serious downsides, including:

    • Producing less-informed voters. After casting an early ballot, a voter checks out of the national debate regardless of what happens. They won’t care about the televised debates, won’t consider options, and won’t fully participate in the political process. Many voters have occasionally complained to election officials and representatives of a desire to recast their vote because they have changed their mind. In most, if not all states, this is impossible to do with early voting.
    • Increasing election administration and campaign costs. Elections that drag on for weeks require the logistical costs of administering an election, including more poll workers and salaries associated with the voting process.
    • Facilitating double voting and vote fraud. Counties that utilize early voting need to have the necessary technology to ensure simultaneous verification and record of vote history. Early voting allows voters to vote anywhere in the county, not simply in their precinct. The jurisdictions must have the necessary voting equipment, statewide registration system, and electronic poll book system to prevent individuals from voting more than once in the state or county during the early voting period. It is also more difficult for political parties to secure sufficient poll watchers to monitor polling places for an extended early voting period.

ACRU Commentary

“People who already sent their ballots in will be destroyed”

With above referenced Freudian slip, the Newyago county clerk notified local voters that, whoops, a (Republican appointed) judge was “left off” absentee ballots already mailed. However this oversight occurred, it will surely cause — at best — confusion for voters. “Didn’t I vote once already?” Just another example that mistakes can cause as much vote disruption as fraud. Vote In Person!

Virginia – 500,000 incorrect applications send out

Elections officials in Virginia are trying to set the record straight, after absentee ballot applications with incorrect information were mailed to more than half a million residents in the Commonwealth. The confusing mailers were sent by an organization known as 'The Center For Voter Information', which identifies itself as "non-partisan and non-profit" on its website.

Mail-in vote system in Detroit deemed “a mess” by election officials

In a city (over)run by Democrats for decades, voting in Detroit’s recent primary was utterly corrupted. When 72% of its precincts reported bad vote counts, the State Board of Canvassers called it “alarming.” Liberal Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson has so far ignored concerns. Within Detroit’s 78% African American population, 40% live in poverty, and the unemployment rate is 21%. These citizens need their political voices heard and protected.

News

ACRU’s Protect Elderly Votes’ concerns about nursing home fraud confirmed

In a state where ballot harvesting is illegal, a remarkable coincidence occurred right before election day. According to reports from the Senate Judiciary Committee, 25,000 nursing home residents in different facilities across the state all requested ballots at the same time. Who ordered them? And more importantly, who filled them out? An investigation is currently ongoing.

The “furthest from my polling station” voting award

In the coolest story of the week, NASA astronaut Kate Rubins voted from space. She is currently stationed on the International Space Station. In 1997, Congress passed a bill allowing voting from space. Who knew? We assume she had no “interference” from her Russian colleagues, Sergey 1 and Sergey 2 as they are affectionately referred to at NASA. A great story to share with your kids.

Court decides the 14th Amendment only applies after elections

In New Jersey, an Obama appointed judge rejected a Republican lawsuit that charged last minute mail-only changes to the state’s voting system would be a vote integrity mess. The judge used a legal maneuver we expect to see more of—no one has yet to “suffer an injury” and therefore the case is dismissible. He even parroted the DNC argument in his opinion that GOP concerns were “hypothetical.” Neither the state nor federal Constitutions seemed to matter.

Liberal state supreme court gives tacit approval to forgery

On Oct. 23, The Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s (5:1 Democrat majority) ruled that local election officials cannot reject mail-in ballots because the voter’s signature on the ballot does not match the voter's signature on file. This is a boon for ballot harvesters, particularly those operating in senior residential facilities, as they no longer must worry about practicing stolen voter signatures before mailing stolen ballots.