Early Voting

Not so long ago, Americans assembled on one designated day — Election Day — to choose our national leaders.

For those unable to cast votes on Election Day, early voting and absentee ballots are available options. In-person early voting has the advantage of the individual citizen at a polling place after check-in by election officials.

Today, however, early voting periods have been stretched to absurd lengths, with some states beginning their voting for the November election more than a month or more in advance. There is no empirical evidence that early voting increases turnout, but it does have serious downsides, including:

    • Producing less-informed voters. After casting an early ballot, a voter checks out of the national debate regardless of what happens. They won’t care about the televised debates, won’t consider options, and won’t fully participate in the political process. Many voters have occasionally complained to election officials and representatives of a desire to recast their vote because they have changed their mind. In most, if not all states, this is impossible to do with early voting.
    • Increasing election administration and campaign costs. Elections that drag on for weeks require the logistical costs of administering an election, including more poll workers and salaries associated with the voting process.
    • Facilitating double voting and vote fraud. Counties that utilize early voting need to have the necessary technology to ensure simultaneous verification and record of vote history. Early voting allows voters to vote anywhere in the county, not simply in their precinct. The jurisdictions must have the necessary voting equipment, statewide registration system, and electronic poll book system to prevent individuals from voting more than once in the state or county during the early voting period. It is also more difficult for political parties to secure sufficient poll watchers to monitor polling places for an extended early voting period.

ACRU Commentary

ACRU’s Blackwell: How low will Democrats go on pushing Jim Crow narrative?

Many on the left claim that voting integrity measures, such as voter ID, are throwbacks to the Jim Crow era. Since Jim Crow laws were enacted by Southern Democrats to force racial segregation and block economic and political power among Black Americans, Democrats should know their current claims are preposterous. As the old saying goes, “they have a lot of nerve.”

Why We Black Leaders Support Voter ID Laws

America is a country of over 300 million people. We are comprised of every shape, size, nationality, and opinion. This diversity has proven to be one of our greatest strengths.However, if you listened to largely white liberal media personalities and elite CEOs, you wouldn’t know this. According to liberal orthodoxy, all Blacks think alike, and all Blacks support Black Lives Matter, and all Blacks oppose the recently enacted Georgia Election Integrity Act.

ACRU’s Blackwell: Goodbye, Election Day. Hello Corrupt Politicians Act

A notorious bill moving through Congress – H.R. 1 – contains a swarm of bad ideas. But little noticed is a provision that makes Election Day obsolete. We’ve lost so many unifying cultural events that bring Americans together, it is no surprise that H.R.1 not only would start the election weeks earlier, but also prolong the election well after Election Day.

Is postal incompetence or deliberate malfeasance responsible for missing votes?

Sometimes ballots magically appear, and sometimes they magically disappear. According to hundreds of GOP voters in the Keystone State, they requested and returned mail ballots, but their votes are not registered on state databases. This was discovered by a small sampling by a vote integrity task force, leading us to wonder how many other missing votes remain missing.

ACRU Action Board Member Ken Blackwell: Legislators, not jurists, are responsible for vote integrity

“In Pennsylvania, there was a clear violation of Article II of Constitution that gives authority to state legislatures to set the calendar and electoral rules for the state’s voters - not the state judiciary, not the Governor, and not the Secretary of State. In other states, liberal lawsuits waved through by liberal judges usurped the power of the people by dismantling vote security measures passed by their state legislators. This must be corrected, and state legislative bodies must reclaim their authority to protect voters against fraud, political criminals and activist judges that overreach. A recent article from The Federalist, noted below, provides a few simple steps legislators can take to ensure the integrity of the election process.”

News

Why We Black Leaders Support Voter ID Laws

America is a country of over 300 million people. We are comprised of every shape, size, nationality, and opinion. This diversity has proven to be one of our greatest strengths.However, if you listened to largely white liberal media personalities and elite CEOs, you wouldn’t know this. According to liberal orthodoxy, all Blacks think alike, and all Blacks support Black Lives Matter, and all Blacks oppose the recently enacted Georgia Election Integrity Act.

Burgess Owens Shreds Democrats’ Comparison Of Voter Integrity Laws To Jim Crow: I ‘Actually Experienced Jim Crow’ Laws

Congressman Burgess Owens (R-UT) on Tuesday slammed Democrats’ claims that Georgia’s new voter integrity laws are somehow comparable to Jim Crow laws. The freshman congressman shared his personal experience under Jim Crow, saying that it’s “extremely offensive” to make the assumption black Americans aren’t capable of getting a form of identification.