Early Voting

Not so long ago, Americans assembled on one designated day — Election Day — to choose our national leaders.

For those unable to cast votes on Election Day, early voting and absentee ballots are available options. In-person early voting has the advantage of the individual citizen at a polling place after check-in by election officials.

Today, however, early voting periods have been stretched to absurd lengths, with some states beginning their voting for the November election more than a month or more in advance. There is no empirical evidence that early voting increases turnout, but it does have serious downsides, including:

    • Producing less-informed voters. After casting an early ballot, a voter checks out of the national debate regardless of what happens. They won’t care about the televised debates, won’t consider options, and won’t fully participate in the political process. Many voters have occasionally complained to election officials and representatives of a desire to recast their vote because they have changed their mind. In most, if not all states, this is impossible to do with early voting.
    • Increasing election administration and campaign costs. Elections that drag on for weeks require the logistical costs of administering an election, including more poll workers and salaries associated with the voting process.
    • Facilitating double voting and vote fraud. Counties that utilize early voting need to have the necessary technology to ensure simultaneous verification and record of vote history. Early voting allows voters to vote anywhere in the county, not simply in their precinct. The jurisdictions must have the necessary voting equipment, statewide registration system, and electronic poll book system to prevent individuals from voting more than once in the state or county during the early voting period. It is also more difficult for political parties to secure sufficient poll watchers to monitor polling places for an extended early voting period.

ACRU Commentary

A citizen’s reminder: absentee ballots have not gone extinct

We are grateful to Mr. Brian Glass of Virginia, who points out in clear prose; 1. A list of confirmed cases of mail-in vote fraud; and 2. The difference between universal mail-in ballots and intentionally requesting an absentee ballot. Yes, we all know this, but sometimes the obvious things are lost in the debate. Everyone in America can still request an absentee ballot. With their name on it. That comes to their actual house.

And also, the dog ate my ballot

Tennessee officials on Friday sought an appeal and an immediate pause to a court’s ruling this week that lets all 4. 1 million registered voters vote by mail during to the coronavirus pandemic, as the state made updates to its materials to reflect the expansion. The state attorney general’s office filed the request in Davidson County Chancery Court to appeal and stay that court’s temporary injunction that expanded absentee eligibility Thursday.

Vote collection mobiles should be relegated to bad Saturday Night Live skits

This is one of those moments when there’s not much we can say other than, “click, look at the picture, and ask, ‘what can possibly go wrong?’” Not to offend modern day VW owners, but the original Volkswagen was a product of fascism. This Philadelphia "voteswagen" plays right back into that history of tyrannical government trampling liberty by making a mockery of safe and secure elections. With wheels.

ACRU’s Spakovsky: List of proven vote fraud cases continues to grow

The Heritage Foundation keeps a record of proven, prosecuted cases of vote fraud in the United States. In May, the case number reached 1,285. Most cases have numerous fraud victims, making each a force multiplier for stolen votes. In the last ten years, there are have been at least eight cases where a candidate won with fewer than 17 votes - three where the margin was one vote. Vote fraud is real, and it matters.

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News

New York election officials skipped math class

Many important things happen immediately after elections for outgoing, newly incoming, and even incumbent officials. Time wasted counting votes means constituents are ignored and fraud gains an edge. A month after New York’s mail in primaries, winners and losers are still in limbo. New York’s nearly mail-only election is a mess and it’s not going to get better by November.

A General’s analysis of the dangers of mail-in voting

Leave it to an Army general to analyze, summarize and finalize the dangers of mail-only voting, succinctly, using data, and then give marching orders to the concerned. In a letter to the North Carolina Pilot, Lt. Gen. Marvin Covault (ret.) uses years of experience and all three of his stars to recognize that mail-only voting is the enemy of vote integrity.

Congressman Thomas Massie (R-KY) posts and Tweets ACRU President Lori Roman’s recent oped “If You Can Go to the Grocery Store, You Can Go to the Polls” and helps ACRU’s message go viral!

"America has resources and institutional knowledge to make in-person voting work. There is no reason for American legislators to run scared. It is time to renew our commitment to free, fair, and secure in-person elections." Rep. Thomas Massie (R-KY) quotes ACRUs recent oped on the dangers of mail-only voting, and why it is unnecessary.

A citizen’s reminder: absentee ballots have not gone extinct

We are grateful to Mr. Brian Glass of Virginia, who points out in clear prose; 1. A list of confirmed cases of mail-in vote fraud; and 2. The difference between universal mail-in ballots and intentionally requesting an absentee ballot. Yes, we all know this, but sometimes the obvious things are lost in the debate. Everyone in America can still request an absentee ballot. With their name on it. That comes to their actual house.

And also, the dog ate my ballot

Tennessee officials on Friday sought an appeal and an immediate pause to a court’s ruling this week that lets all 4. 1 million registered voters vote by mail during to the coronavirus pandemic, as the state made updates to its materials to reflect the expansion. The state attorney general’s office filed the request in Davidson County Chancery Court to appeal and stay that court’s temporary injunction that expanded absentee eligibility Thursday.

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