Voter ID

Requiring voters to prove they are who they say they are in order to cast a ballot is a simple, common-sense measure that helps ensure honest elections.

Opponents of photo ID falsely charge that such requirements discriminate against poor and minority voters. Each time this claim has been used in the courts, plaintiffs have failed to produce evidence of any individual who was actually denied the right to vote for lack of a photo ID. Despite this fact, and that all demographic groups including African-Americans support voter ID laws, accusations of Jim Crow, the racist system that disenfranchised Southern blacks for generations, continue to be hurled with abandon.

The Supreme Court has stated that because voter ID is free, the inconveniences of going to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles, gathering applicable documents, or posing for a photograph are not substantial burdens on most voters’ right to vote. Nor do they represent a significant increase over the usual burdens of voting — registering or driving to a polling place. If people show up without an ID, they can cast a provisional ballot and bring in their ID later.

The Supreme Court found that the interests in requiring voter ID are unquestionably relevant in protecting the integrity and reliability of the electoral process as part of a nationwide effort to improve and modernize election procedures criticized as antiquated and inefficient.

In Crawford v. Marion County Election Board (2008), the Supreme Court also noted the particular interest in preventing voter fraud in response to the problem of voter registration rolls with a large number of names of persons who are either deceased or no longer live in Indiana. While the trial record contained no evidence that “in-person voter impersonation at polling places had actually occurred in Indiana, such fraud had occurred in other parts of the country, and Indiana’s own experience with voter fraud in a 2003 mayoral primary demonstrates a real risk that voter fraud could affect a close election’s outcome.”

The Supreme Court noted that there was no question that the state had a legitimate and important interest in counting only eligible voters’ ballots. Lastly the Court noted that the state interest in protecting public confidence in elections also has independent importance because such voter confidence encourages citizen participation in the democratic process.

Using a photo ID for voting is a central recommendation from the bipartisan Commission on Federal Election Reform, headed by former President Jimmy Carter and former Secretary of State James Baker. Here’s what the commission’s official report says:

“A good registration list will ensure that citizens are only registered in one place, but election officials still need to make sure that the person arriving at a polling site is the same one that is named on the registration list. In the old days and in small towns where everyone knows each other, voters did not need to identify themselves. But in the United States, where 40 million people move each year, and in urban areas where some people do not even know the people living in their own apartment building let alone their precinct, some form of identification is needed.”

The electoral system cannot inspire public confidence if no safeguards exist to deter or detect fraud or to confirm the identity of voters. Photo IDs currently are needed to board a plane, enter federal buildings, and cash a check. Voting is equally important.”

ACRU Commentary

Is postal incompetence or deliberate malfeasance responsible for missing votes?

Sometimes ballots magically appear, and sometimes they magically disappear. According to hundreds of GOP voters in the Keystone State, they requested and returned mail ballots, but their votes are not registered on state databases. This was discovered by a small sampling by a vote integrity task force, leading us to wonder how many other missing votes remain missing.

Pennsylvania mail ballot problems kept tens of thousands from voting in primary election

To make sure your vote counts, vote in person. Wear your mask, stay six feet behind your neighbors, wash your hands when you’re done, and don’t mail your ballot. With evidence coming in from mail-in ballot fails from several states, USPS admits it cannot handle the load. Because of postal drag, at least 92,000 votes in Pennsylvania’s recent primary were not counted. Don’t let that be you in November.

Election Department Employee Alerts Clerk Tina Peters to Voter Fraud Leading to Arrest

A key ACRU vote integrity message is calling for election officials to be on alert for fraud. Case in point, a Colorado official who noticed a deceased gentlemen reinstated “his” voter registration. Kudos to election coordinator Sandra Brown, whose eagle eye resulted in vote fraud charges against one Larry Talbert. Other officials take note - databases already exist for cross checking - you just have to use them.

California mail ballots: tossing them from buildings would be just as secure

The number of registered voters is fluid. Voters move, they pass away, and in California, people can register to vote when applying for a driver’s license even if they are not citizens. Those residing in institutional settings are a revolving door of voters. Therefore, Governor Newsom’s directive to send a ballot to every “registered voter” is the opposite of vote integrity. The state’s GOP is suing to stop this travesty. We wish them the best in nipping this potential fraud in the bud. 

Load More Posts

News

Detroit area judge throws out multiple affidavits describing fraud, just because

A Wayne County, Michigan, liberal judge elected in a 74% Democrat district, made this statement about allegation of blatant fraud and election interference at Detroit’s largest voting station: “the Plaintiffs' interpretation of events is incorrect.” How about “the judge’s overstepping his state and Constitutional authority by playing prosecutor and providing his own biased testimony is incorrect.”

Is postal incompetence or deliberate malfeasance responsible for missing votes?

Sometimes ballots magically appear, and sometimes they magically disappear. According to hundreds of GOP voters in the Keystone State, they requested and returned mail ballots, but their votes are not registered on state databases. This was discovered by a small sampling by a vote integrity task force, leading us to wonder how many other missing votes remain missing.

Taking advantage of the homeless

Carlos Antonio De Bourbon Montenegro and Marcos Raul Arevalo of Los Angeles have been accused of requesting 8,000 ballots in the names of homeless people and setting up postal boxes to receive those ballots before completing and submitting them. This is what happens when a governor demands un-solicited ballots to be delivered wherever.

“While I breathe, I hope” – Palmetto legislators put the state motto into action

The state’s Republican congressional delegation, led by Rep. Joe Wilson, recently held a press conference at the South Carolina State House (not Washington, DC) to express their disgust at reports of vote fraud. The Members called for all illegal ballots to be weeded out and discarded, and announced they are working on federal legislation requiring voter ID, vote fraud hotlines and a national program to cross-reference state voter rolls.

Georgia legislators must prevent stolen Senate seats

Liberals with no qualms about stealing your wages through taxes, and your speech through censorship, are now overtly trying to steal the Senate elections in Georgia as they publicly call for fraud. It is a federal felony to "move" to a state just to vote, as ACRU Policy Board Member Hans von Spakovsky notes in this piece written for The Heritage Foundation. Georgia state legislators need to act NOW to prevent a massive influx of new “voter” registrations.

Load More Posts